HOW TO BECOME AN ELECTRICIAN

We’ll guide you step-by-step on your journey to a successful career as an electrician.
Electrical FAQs
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Step 1

Get your high school diploma or GED.

An electrician needs a foundation in math (i.e., one year of algebra), science (i.e., physics) and practical courses (i.e., electronics).

Step 2

Get formal training.

Complete an apprenticeship program or training at a local trade school.

Step 3

Get licensed.

Although electrician licensing requirements vary from area to area, electricians usually must pass a location-specific examination that tests their knowledge of electrical theory, the National Electrical Code, and local electric and building codes.

Step 4

Get working.

Residential service careers are in demand all over the country.

THE ELECTRICIAN CAREER PATH

You can take advantage of any of these opportunities when you choose the electrical trade.

Why Become an Electrician?

Working with electricity is a fulfilling career because it requires an electrician to have a good working knowledge of the relevant electric codes. Electrical work doesn’t get tedious, because every day brings something new and fresh to the profession. It also offers tremendous benefits and career potential.
Based on the latest Bureau of Labor Statistics data, the average electrician in the United States makes over $52,000/year.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics also predicts that the demand for qualified electricians will explode in the next ten years. In fact, they expect more than 85,900 new electrician jobs to be created between 2014 and 2024, which is a staggering 14% increase. Based on their analysis of the growth of various industries and professions, this is significantly higher than average.

When considering becoming an electrician you are considering a career path that grants you the opportunity to find a job today. The demand for skilled tradespeople continues to grow across the USA.

“Right now, American manufacturing is struggling to fill 200,000 vacant positions. There are 450,000 openings in trades, transportation and utilities. The Skills Gap is real, and it’s getting wider. In Alabama, a third of all skilled tradesmen are over 55. They’re retiring fast, and no one is there to replace them.”

– Mike Rowe

As an electrician you will experience the opportunity for advancement in your career. After starting as a service technician, hard-working and committed electricians can become promoted to field managers, operation managers and even distribution managers within their company and field.

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